Data Management Plan for the California LCC project:

Climate-Driven Alteration of Intertidal Habitats for Migratory Birds in the San Francisco Bay Estuary

Table of Contents
Data Input - New Collections
  1   Relationships among geomorphic change, invertebrate prey, and avian foraging on mudflats

Data Input - Existing Collections
  1   Waterfowl Surveys
  2   Bathymetry of South San Francisco Bay Shoals
  3   Benthic Atlas

Data Output - Product or Deliverables
  1   Digital Elevation Models of South San Francisco Bay Shoals
  2   Delft DFlow-FM Model of South San Francisco Bay Shoals
  3   Assessment of south SFB wave energy, tidal currents, and sediment flux
  4   Shorebird carrying capacity models for South San Francisco Bay shoals
  5   Assessment of waterbird habitat change under different scenarios of SLR and geomorphic change
  6   DEM for South SF Bay Shoals

Not Data - non-data Products
  1   Presentation at AGU Meeting
  2   Presentation at Bay-Delta Science Conference
  3   Temporal trends in tidal flat shape and associated environmental parameters in South San Francisco Bay between the 1890s and 2005
  4   Presentation at State of the Estuary Conference
  5   Carrying capacity of diving benthivores on San Pablo Bay shoals
  6   Presentation for California South Bay Science Symposium
  7   Presentation at Bay Delta Science Conference
  8   Morphological Change in the San Francisco Estuary from the 1850s to 1980s: Application to Modeling Response to Climate Change and Sea Level Rise
  9   Mudflat loss during South San Francisco Bay salt pond restoration- Regional and global perspectives on initial post-restoration changes
  10   Mudflat loss during South San Francisco Bay restoration: The 800-pound sea level rise gorilla
  11   Mudflat evolution at decadal and seasonal time scales
  12   Will Salt Pond Restoration in South San Francisco Bay Cause Erosion of Mudflats and Sloughs?
  13   Influence of history and environment on sediment dynamics of intertidal flats
  14   Small Shorebird Carrying Capacity: Dumbarton Shoals
  15   Shorebird Foraging Model for a South San Francisco Bay Mud Flat
  16   South Bay Mudflats and their carrying capacity for shorebirds
  17   Temporal and Spatial Patterns in Benthic Invertebrates in the San Francisco Bay
  18   Spatial and temporal patterns in benthic invertebrates in San Francisco Bay
  19   Spatial and temporal patterns in benthic invertebrates along the Dumbarton Shoals in San Francisco Bay
  20   Workshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds
  21   Workshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds
  22   Sediment Transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: An Overview
  23   Niche partitioning, threshold food densities, and limits to prey depletion by diving ducks in an estuarine bay
  24   Effects of Restoration on the Small Shorebird Carrying Capacity of a South Bay Mud Flat. MA Thesis, San Francisco State University.
  25   First Phase Final Report: Climate-driven geomorphic alteration of intertidal habitats for foraging migratory birds in the San Francisco Bay estuary: a California landscape conservation cooperative project
  26   Modeling Workshop
  27   Methodology of quantifying key metrics for habitat change
  28   Comprehensive review on foraging of migratory birds on shoal habitats

Data Input - Existing Collections
1Waterfowl Surveys
DescriptionAbundance and behavior surveys of waterfowl in San Francisco Bay (hereafter SFB) during 1988-1990 and 2004-2005
NCCWSC Collection Protocolsbased on methods developed by USGS SFBE
FormatMicrosoft Excel databases
Backup and StorageBacked up on USGS WERC San Francisco Bay Estuary Server
Volume Estimate300 MB
RestrictionsData will be fully available for reports and plans. We require that permission be requested to use the dataset for publications, except for project partners.
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542

2Bathymetry of South San Francisco Bay Shoals
DescriptionElevation and bathymetry data collected on South SFB shoals, benthic geomorphology mapped.
NCCWSC Collection ProtocolsSingle-beam Sonar
Formatbathymetric and topographic data, ArcGIS shapefiles, Geotiff (raster)
Backup and StorageBacked up on USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center server, Santa Cruz, CA
Volume Estimate5 GB
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542

3Benthic Atlas
Deliverable TypeDatasets / Database
DescriptionBenthic Atlas

Data Input - New Collections
1Relationships among geomorphic change, invertebrate prey, and avian foraging on mudflats
Deliverable TypeReport
DescriptionConduct surveys on avian foraging density and behavior and site-specific richness and density of benthic invertebrate prey on SFB shoals; use this data to assess the relationships among avian foraging, invertebrate prey, and changing mudflat geomorphology.
SourceCollected by PIs and collaborators
FormatPDF and maps.
Processing and WorkflowSurvey density and focal behavior of foraging waterbirds on mudflats; collect, sort, identify invertebrates on shoals, create interpolated maps of population density via ArcGIS
Backup and StorageBacked up on USGS Western Ecological Research Center Server
Volume Estimate100 MB
Exclusive Use EmbargoProject data will be made publically available concomitant with publication of results in peer-reviewed journal or within 2 years, whichever comes first.
RestrictionsData will be fully available for reports and plans. We require that permission be requested to use the dataset for publications, except for project partners.
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542

Data Output - Product or Deliverables
1Digital Elevation Models of South San Francisco Bay Shoals
Deliverable TypeDatasets / Database
DescriptionElevation and bathymetric survey data synthesized into a continuous digital elevation model (DEM) in ArcGIS.
FormatTIF raster
Processing and WorkflowInterpolation of aerial lidar data survey elevations and bathymetric data using ArcGIS
Backup and StorageBacked up on USGS servers
Volume Estimate16 GB
Exclusive Use EmbargoProject data will be made publically available concomitant with publication of results in peer-reviewed journal or within 2 years time, whichever comes first.
RestrictionsData will be fully available for reports and plans. We require that permission be requested to use the dataset for publications, except for project partners.
Linkhttp://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2011/1315/
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542
Commons Cataloged DatasetBathymetry and Digital Elevation Models of Coyote Creek and Alviso Slough, South San Francisco Bay, California

2Delft DFlow-FM Model of South San Francisco Bay Shoals
Deliverable TypeApplications and Tools
DescriptionThe Deltares Delft3D FM (flexible mesh) model of the Bay-Delta that provides boundary conditions for the South San Francisco Bay geomorphic model, which is now a 1D model that is spatially extrapolated to 2D, was released at the Bay-Delta Conference in October 2014. The San Francisco Bay-Delta Community Model is an open source Delft3D FM model and allows for continuous development of a process-based, hydrodynamic surface water flow model of the San Francisco Bay-Delta system. The domain covers an area from Point Reyes up to the tidal limits near Sacramento and Vernalis and includes the entire Bay. A high-resolution mesh ultimately allows for detailed computations of flow (including salinity and temperature), sediment transport (sand and mud transport, suspended sediment concentration, turbidity, morphodynamics), water quality (including turbidity, phytoplankton, nutrients, and contaminants) and ecosystems (habitat indicators). A publicly accessible web site supplies all the grids and software to run the model and post-process the output. The community model is developed through multiple funding sources including this LCC project and the USGS CASCaDE project.
Processing and WorkflowThe Delft model builds on existing data to assess changes to shoal habitats given different SLR and climate change scenarios.
Linkhttp://www.d3d-baydelta.org
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542

3Assessment of south SFB wave energy, tidal currents, and sediment flux
Deliverable TypeReport
DescriptionExplore the effects of tidal currents and wave energy (from existing data) on suspended sediment concentrations and sediment flux in South San Francisco Bay in order to model how such mechanisms translate to the maintenance of shoal habitats over time.
Processing and WorkflowUse existing data on tidal currents and wave energy in South SFB, as well as measurements of sediment flux in South SFB.
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542

4Shorebird carrying capacity models for South San Francisco Bay shoals
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionThese models will determine how sediment and morphological changes may affect community composition and availability of avian macroinvertebrate food resources.
Processing and WorkflowThese models of South San Francisco Bay shoal carrying capacity will be based on daily ration modeling via SAS and R, and parameterized with information from both prey-based and habitat-based models. We will use CANOCO 4 to perform canonical correspondence analyses to reveal gradients in species composition and relate log-transformed macroinvertebrate abundance values to environmental variables (salinity, bed elevation, sediment grain size).
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov, 831-460-7542

5Assessment of waterbird habitat change under different scenarios of SLR and geomorphic change
Deliverable TypeReport
DescriptionThis assessment will involve the development of habitat relationship models of bird and invert distributions in south SFB, as well as a report and manuscript integrating findings from these products. We will use ArcGIS to map expected macroinvertebrate densities in response to changing physical conditions and to compare the current and projected extent of shoal habitats through the next half of a century with our knowledge of foraging ecology of migratory birds to estimate likely functional and numerical responses to alteration of their foraging resources.
ContactBruce Jaffe, bjaffe@usgs.gov

6DEM for South SF Bay Shoals
Deliverable TypeDatasets / Database
DescriptionA 2m resolution seamless bathy/topo DEM developed by the USGS EROS Data Center as part of their Coastal National Elevation Dataset (coNED) project. The DEM was generated from the most recent bathymetric and topographic data available. This LCC project oversaw merging data collected in South Bay by USGS projects into the DEM.
Linkhttp://topotools.cr.usgs.gov/topobathy_viewer/

Not Data - non-data Products
1Presentation at AGU Meeting
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionAchete, F., Van der Wegen, M., and Jaffe, B.E., 2012, Long-term impacts due to sediment supply changes to the San Francisco Bay-Delta system, Abstract OS21C-1763 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 3-7 Dec.

2Presentation at Bay-Delta Science Conference
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionAchete, F., Van der Wegen, M., and Jaffe, B.E., 2012, Long-term impacts due to sediment supply changes to the San Francisco Bay-Delta system, (abs.) Bay-Delta Science Conference

3Temporal trends in tidal flat shape and associated environmental parameters in South San Francisco Bay between the 1890s and 2005
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionBearman, J., Friedrichs, C., Jaffe, B., and Foxgrover, A., 2010, Temporal trends in tidal flat shape and associated environmental parameters in South San Francisco Bay between the 1890s and 2005, (abs.) Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Biennial Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas conference, Coastal and estuarine observations and modeling, 14-17 September 2010, Colombo, Sri Lanka, p. 16-19.

4Presentation at State of the Estuary Conference
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionDe La Cruz, S.E.W., J.Y. Takekawa, A.K. Miles, J. M. Eadie. 2011. Importance of shallow-water shoals to migratory birds: surf scoters as a case study. State of the Estuary Conference, 20 -21 September, Oakland, CA.

5Carrying capacity of diving benthivores on San Pablo Bay shoals
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionDe La Cruz, S. E. W. 2010. Carrying capacity of diving benthivores on San Pablo Bay Shoals.

6Presentation for California South Bay Science Symposium
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionElias. E. and Jaffe, B.E., 2011, [abs.]: Modeling the effects of sea level rise on waves and currents in South Bay, San Francisco, California [abs.]: South Bay Science Symposium, "Research Supporting Restoration of South Bay Salt Ponds, Bay and Watershed Research," Menlo Park, Calif., February 3, 2011.

7Presentation at Bay Delta Science Conference
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionJaffe, B.E., Finlayson, D., and Foxgrover, A.C., 2010, Will Restoration Cause Loss of Mudflats in South San Francisco Bay, Bay-Delta Science Conference, Sacramento, CA.

8Morphological Change in the San Francisco Estuary from the 1850s to 1980s: Application to Modeling Response to Climate Change and Sea Level Rise
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionJaffe, B.E., van der Wegen, M., Elias, E., and Roelvink, D., Foxgrover, A., and Fregoso, T., 2010, Morphological Change in the San Francisco Estuary from the 1850s to 1980s: Application to Modeling Response to Climate Change and Sea Level Rise, (abs.) Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Biennial Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas conference, Coastal and estuarine observations and modeling, 14-17 September 2010, Colombo, Sri Lanka, p. 120-123.

9 Mudflat loss during South San Francisco Bay salt pond restoration- Regional and global perspectives on initial post-restoration changes
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionJaffe, B.E., Foxgrover, A., and Finlayson, D., 2011, Mudflat loss during South San Francisco Bay salt pond restoration- Regional and global perspectives on initial post-restoration changes [abs.]: South Bay Science Symposium, "Research Supporting Restoration of South Bay Salt Ponds, Bay and Watershed Research," Menlo Park, Calif., February 3, 2011.

10Mudflat loss during South San Francisco Bay restoration: The 800-pound sea level rise gorilla
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionJaffe, B., Foxgrover, A., and Finlayson, D., 2011, Mudflat loss during South San Francisco Bay restoration: The 800-pound sea level rise gorilla, 10th Biennial State of the Estuary Conference, Oakland, CA, p. 45.

11Mudflat evolution at decadal and seasonal time scales
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionJaffe, B., Foxgrover, A., and Finlayson, D., 2012, Mudflat evolution at decadal and seasonal time scales, Abstract for the 16th Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas (PECS) conference, New York City, NY, 12-16 August 2012.

12Will Salt Pond Restoration in South San Francisco Bay Cause Erosion of Mudflats and Sloughs?
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionJaffe, B., Foxgrover, A., and Finlayson, D., Fregoso, T., Takekawa, J., and Marvin-DiPasquale, M., 2012, Will Salt Pond Restoration in South San Francisco Bay Cause Erosion of Mudflats and Sloughs? (abs.) Bay-Delta Science Conference

13Influence of history and environment on sediment dynamics of intertidal flats
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionJones, C. and Jaffe, B.E., 2012, Influence of history and environment on sediment dynamics of intertidal flats, (abs.) Bay Delta Science Conference

14Small Shorebird Carrying Capacity: Dumbarton Shoals
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionRowan, A. I. Woo, J. Lovvorn, J. Takekawa, and J. Davis. 2011. Small Shorebird Carrying Capacity: Dumbarton Shoals. Poster Presentation. 2011 State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference. Oakland, CA.

15Shorebird Foraging Model for a South San Francisco Bay Mud Flat
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionRowan, A. I. Woo, J. Lovvorn, J. Takekawa, and J. Davis. 2011. Small Shorebird Foraging Model for a South San Francisco Bay Mud Flat. Poster presentation. State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference. Oakland, CA

16South Bay Mudflats and their carrying capacity for shorebirds
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionRowan-Rocha, A. 2010. South Bay Mudflats and their carrying capacity for shorebirds. Workshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds. October 26 Ð 27, 2010. Berkeley, California

17Temporal and Spatial Patterns in Benthic Invertebrates in the San Francisco Bay
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionWoo, I. 2010. Temporal and Spatial Patterns in Benthic Invertebrates in the San Francisco Bay. Workshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds. October 26 Ð 27, 2010. Berkeley, California

18Spatial and temporal patterns in benthic invertebrates in San Francisco Bay
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionWoo, I., J. Y. Takekawa, B. Jaffe, G. Shellenbarger, D. Shoellhamer, W. Chan, A. Smith, and E. Flynn. 2010. Spatial and temporal patterns in benthic invertebrates in San Francisco Bay. Invited oral presentation. 6th Biennial Calfed Bay-Delta Science Conference. Sacramento, CA.

19Spatial and temporal patterns in benthic invertebrates along the Dumbarton Shoals in San Francisco Bay
Deliverable TypePresentation
DescriptionWoo, I., J. Y. Takekawa, B. Jaffe, G. Shellenbarger, D. Shoellhamer, W. Chan, A. Smith, and E. Flynn. 2010. Spatial and temporal patterns in benthic invertebrates along the Dumbarton Shoals in San Francisco Bay. Oral presentation. Napa Sonoma Marsh Restoration Group. Vallejo, CA.

20Workshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds
Deliverable TypeTraining / Outreach / Workshop
DescriptionWorkshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds. October 26 Ð 27, 2010. Berkeley, California

21Workshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds
Deliverable TypeTraining / Outreach / Workshop
DescriptionWorkshop on Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds. October 26 Ð 27, 2010. Berkeley, California. A two day workshop that brought together geomorphic and avian experts as well as local stakeholders to share ideas on the biophysical interfaces between physical and ecological models. Host and lead in workshop.

22Sediment Transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: An Overview
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionBarnard, P.L., Schoellhamer, D.H., Jaffe, B.E., and McGee, L.J., Accepted, Sediment Transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: An Overview, Marine Geology, 65 p. double-spaced text, 5 figures.
Linkhttp://ca.water.usgs.gov/pubs/2013/BarnardEtAl2013.pdf

23Niche partitioning, threshold food densities, and limits to prey depletion by diving ducks in an estuarine bay
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionLovvorn, J.R., S. E. W. De La Cruz, J. Y. Takekawa, L. E. Shaskey, and S. E. Richman. In press. Niche partitioning, threshold food densities, and limits to prey depletion by diving ducks in an estuarine bay. Marine Ecology Progress Series. Rowan, A. 2012.
Linkhttp://www.int-res.com/articles/suppl/m476p251_supp.pdf

24Effects of Restoration on the Small Shorebird Carrying Capacity of a South Bay Mud Flat. MA Thesis, San Francisco State University.
Deliverable TypeReport
DescriptionEffects of Restoration on the Small Shorebird Carrying Capacity of a South Bay Mud Flat. MA Thesis, San Francisco State University. 33pp

25First Phase Final Report: Climate-driven geomorphic alteration of intertidal habitats for foraging migratory birds in the San Francisco Bay estuary: a California landscape conservation cooperative project
Deliverable TypeReport
DescriptionJaffe, B. E., J. Y. Takekawa, L. E. Shaskey, and A. C. Foxgrover. 2011. Climate-driven geomorphic alteration of intertidal habitats for foraging migratory birds in the San Francisco Bay estuary: a California landscape conservation cooperative project. Unpublished Data Summary Report to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service California Landscape Conservation Cooperative. Vallejo and Santa Cruz, California. 70pp. [URL: http://www.werc.usgs.gov/Productdetails.aspx?ID=4200]
Linkhttp://www.werc.usgs.gov/Productdetails.aspx?ID=4200

26Modeling Workshop
Deliverable TypeTraining / Outreach / Workshop
DescriptionOn 26-27 October 2010, we hosted a workshop in Berkeley, California entitled ―Modeling Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Ecology of Shoals and Migratory Birds.‖ The two-day workshop invited 20 participants including invited speakers, research scientists, and resource managers. Expert modelers invited to participate included Dr. Dano Roelvink (Deltares, Netherlands), Dr. Neil Ganju (USGS Woods Hole Science Center), and Dr. Noah Knowles (USGS Menlo Park Science Center). The overall goal was to discuss modeling approaches and identify linkages between physical and biological models about this critical topic. Results from the discussions indicated that modeling sea level rise (SLR) effects on shoals was both feasible and timely with several complementary efforts (see below). A brief summary of key modeling topics are presented in following paragraphs.  Avian ecology on shoals: Prey quality, abundance, distribution, and accessibility influence bird carrying capacity and population health. Prey and physical characteristics interact to determine the area available for foraging. Although invertebrates are primary food on shoals, biofilm may be a key food source for some smaller shorebirds. Physical factors influence prey abundance and availability, while habitat use is affected by proximity of suitable roosting or nesting areas. Some of these datasets are available from existing USGS shoals research studies.  Biophysical interface: Physical drivers on biota include tidal inundation and exposure, salinity, temperature, water depth, and sediment type. Phytoplankton dynamics are an important interface between physical processes and invertebrate response. Predation pressure is determined by water depth, slope, movement of the tide line, and sediment permeability. Maintenance of biofilm requires sufficient light and low turbidity, and biofilm may determine cohesiveness of sediments. USGS Western Ecological Research Center currently is working on biofilm foraging by shorebirds in cooperation with world expert Dr. Tomohiro Kuwae.  Geomorphic modeling: Downscaled global climate change models provide temperature and precipitation predictions to determine potential effects on hydrology. Delta inflows, winds, and SLR are used to model changes in hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and geomorphology. Hourly Golden Gate tides are modeled with global SLR scenarios, El Niño, storm surges, barometric pressure, and tides, and outputs include water levels, floodplain expansion, and sediment availability that are inputs to estuarine geomorphic models of tidal flat change. Delft-UNSTRUC model with 3-D grids may be used to simulate hydrodynamics, sediment, geomorphology, salinity, and temperature along a continuum of ocean to river under one model framework. We will 2 coordinate this model with ongoing development of the USGS-led models under CASCaDE (Computational Assessments of Scenarios of Change for the Delta Ecosystem).  Habitat connectivity: There is an integral link between destruction and formation of tidal flats and marshes. Marsh erosion and storm action are integral to the modeling. Work will be coordinated with USGS hydrodynamic studies at Corte Madera marsh, conducted in cooperation with the Army Corp of Engineers and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission.  Extreme events: Frequency or severity of extreme events should be assessed with sea level rise. Historical datasets are critical to identify effects on birds and mud flats. Parameters include: rate and degree of sea level rise, frequency and severity of storms, extreme high tide events, marine influences (upwelling, North Pacific Gyre Oscillation, and El Niño), and acidification.  Key modeling parameters: Habitat metrics include physical influences on avian foraging and prey accessibility (water depth, slope, movement of tide line, and sediment permeability), as well as factors determining the suitability of food sources. Density, distribution, biomass, and size classes of invertebrates are dependent on tidal inundation-exposure regime, predation pressure, water quality, benthic conditions, phytoplankton, and seasonally-variable external forcing factors.

27Methodology of quantifying key metrics for habitat change
Deliverable TypeMethodology / Protocol
DescriptionModeling grids from the ROMS model developed for Suisun Bay as part of CASCaDE were provided by Dr. Neil Ganju, our invited speaker and collaborator (Ganju and Schoellhamer 2010). We evaluated existing modeling grids and methods for quantifying key metrics of habitat change in the South Bay. A series of metrics for habitat change may be created by analyzing geomorphic change from these scenarios, and it is expected that model grid cell size will determine the spatial scale of the metrics. Limitations in use of output from hydrodynamic-sediment, transport geomorphic models on habitat metrics would be part of such an analysis.

28Comprehensive review on foraging of migratory birds on shoal habitats
Deliverable TypeReport
DescriptionWe conducted a comprehensive overview of research on shoal habitats and foraging birds to help guide future directions for modeling. An extensive review of over 300 scientific journal articles was completed and incorporated into a scientific review paper. The literature review summarizes biotic and abiotic influences on foraging suitability for avian species on tidal flats and shoals, explores foraging strategies, species requirements, and community dynamics, discusses various influences on bird carrying capacity, outlines the threats to mud flat and shoal ecosystems, discusses the role of restoration and alternative or artificial habitats, and prioritizes research and management activities. The comprehensive bibliography is provided in this report.

This Data Management Plan structure is based on recommendations from the Data Management Plan Guidance document from the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center