Data Management Plan for the California LCC project:

Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California

Table of Contents
Data Input - New Collections
      (nothing in this category)

Data Input - Existing Collections
      (nothing in this category)

Data Output - Product or Deliverables
  1   California Native Fish Distribution Maps
  2   Maps of fish biodiversity and imperilment in California
  3   Predicted Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California

Not Data - non-data Products
  1   Article in March 2014 Estuary News
  2   Recovery of Pacific Salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the Face of Climate Change: A Case Study of the Klamath River Basin, California
  3   Dam removal and anadromous salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) conservation in California
  4   Potential Factors Affecting Survival Differ by Run-Timing and Location: Linear Mixed-Effects Models of Pacific Salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the Klamath River, California

Data Output - Product or Deliverables
1California Native Fish Distribution Maps
Deliverable TypeDatasets / Database
DescriptionDistribution (present and historical) maps for all 133 native freshwater fish species in California. Maps include observation made during field surveys by various state and federal agencies.
SourceMultiple sources were used including databases from CA Fish and Wildlife, NatureServe, CalTrout, and FERC relicensing
Formatpdf and shp
Quality ChecksAll maps were checked multiple times by P. Moyle and R. Quiñones
Backup and StorageMaps are stored and available to the public at http://watershed.ucdavis.edu
Access and SharingAccess will be made to the public as read-only.
RestrictionsAll maps must be acknowledged and cited as Quinones, R.M., P.B. Moyle, J.V. Katz, A. Bell, and N. Santos (2013) Current and historical distributions of California inland fishes. www.watershed.ucdavis.edu
Archive Organizationshttp://watershed.ucdavis.edu
CitationQuinones, R.M., P.B. Moyle, J.V. Katz, A. Bell, and N. Santos (2013) Current and historical distributions of California inland fishes. www.watershed.ucdavis.edu
Linkhttp://pisces.ucdavis.edu/fish
Commons Cataloged DatasetCalifornia Fish Distribution Maps

2Maps of fish biodiversity and imperilment in California
Deliverable TypeMap
DescriptionMaps have been generated to detail the current and historical biodiversity (no. of species per HUC 12) and imperilment (no. of species existing/no. of species historically * 100 per HUC12) for the entire state. Data is being combined with data for invertebrates and a larger set of maps will be published in 2015-16.
SourceData came from multiple state and federal agencies as well as from work completed by Quiñones and Moyle
Formatpdf
Quality ChecksMaps have been checked by R. Quinones, A. Bell, and T. Grantham
Backup and StorageMaps will be stored at watershed.ucdavis.edu
Access and SharingMaps will be available to the public as read-only at watershed.ucdavis.edu
RestrictionsMaps must be cited as Quiñones et al. 2013.
Archive Organizationshttp://watershed.ucdavis.edu
CitationQuinones, R.M., P.B. Moyle, A. Bell, T. Grantham. 2013. Biodiversity and imperilment of California inland fishes. http://watershed.ucdavis.edu
Linkhttp://pisces.ucdavis.edu/fish

3Predicted Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California
Deliverable TypeDatasets / Database
DescriptionBaseline and climate change vulnerability scores were derived for 121 native and 43 nonnative (alien) fish species.
Commons Cataloged DatasetPredicted Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California

Not Data - non-data Products
1Article in March 2014 Estuary News
Deliverable TypePublication : Article
DescriptionArticle in San Francisco Estuary Partnerships' March 2014 issue of Estuary News magazine.
Linkhttp://climate.calcommons.org/sites/default/files/CALCC-Mar2014-EstuaryNews.pdf

2Recovery of Pacific Salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the Face of Climate Change: A Case Study of the Klamath River Basin, California
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionClimate change is predicted to alter aquatic habitats to the extent that many imperiled salmon and trout species (salmonids; Oncorhynchus spp.) face an escalating threat of extinction in California. This dissertation examines the impacts of climate change on salmonids from the Klamath River basin, the second largest river system in California, and now most likely the primary producer of wild salmonids in the state.

3Dam removal and anadromous salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) conservation in California
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionDam removal is often proposed for restoration of anadromous salmonid populations, which are in serious decline in California. However, the benefits of dam removal vary due to differences in affected populations and potential for environmental impacts. Here, we develop an assessment method to examine the relationship between dam removal and salmonid conservation, focusing on dams that act as complete migration barriers. Specifically, we (1) review the effects of dams on anadromous salmonids, (2) describe factors specific to dam removal in California, (3) propose a method to evaluate dam removal effects on salmonids, (4) apply this method to evaluate 24 dams, and (5) discuss potential effects of removing four dams on the Klamath River. Our flexible rating system can rapidly assess the likely effects of dam removal, as a first step in the prioritization of multiple dam removals. We rated eight dams proposed for removal and compared them with another 16 dams, which are not candidates for removal. Twelve of the 24 dams evaluated had scores that indicated at least a moderate benefit to salmonids following removal. In particular, scores indicated that removal of the four dams on the Klamath River is warranted for salmonid conservation. Ultimately, all dams will be abandoned, removed, or rebuilt even if the timespan is hundreds of years. Thus, periodic evaluation of the environmental benefits of dam removal is needed using criteria such as those presented in this paper.

4Potential Factors Affecting Survival Differ by Run-Timing and Location: Linear Mixed-Effects Models of Pacific Salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the Klamath River, California
Deliverable TypePublication
DescriptionUnderstanding factors influencing survival of Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) is essential to species conservation, because drivers of mortality can vary over multiple spatial and temporal scales. Although recent studies have evaluated the effects of climate, habitat quality, or resource management (e.g., hatchery operations) on salmonid recruitment and survival, a failure to look at multiple factors simultaneously leaves open questions about the relative importance of different factors. We analyzed the relationship between ten factors and survival (1980–2007) of four populations of salmonids with distinct life histories from two adjacent watersheds (Salmon and Scott rivers) in the Klamath River basin, California. The factors were ocean abundance, ocean harvest, hatchery releases, hatchery returns, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, North Pacific Gyre Oscillation, El Nin˜o Southern Oscillation, snow depth, flow, and watershed disturbance. Permutation tests and linear mixedeffects models tested effects of factors on survival of each taxon. Potential factors affecting survival differed among taxa and between locations. Fall Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha survival trends appeared to be driven partially or entirely by hatchery practices. Trends in three taxa (Salmon River spring Chinook salmon, Scott River fall Chinook salmon; Salmon River summer steelhead trout O. mykiss) were also likely driven by factors subject to climatic forcing (ocean abundance, summer flow). Our findings underscore the importance of multiple factors in simultaneously driving population trends in widespread species such as anadromous salmonids. They also show that the suite of factors may differ among different taxa in the same location as well as among populations of the same taxa in different watersheds. In the Klamath basin, hatchery practices need to be reevaluated to protect wild salmonids.

This Data Management Plan structure is based on recommendations from the Data Management Plan Guidance document from the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center